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The frill shark, also known as a Frilled shark usually lives in waters of a depth of 600 meters and so it is very rare that this shark is found alive at sea-level. It uses quick lunges to sink those teeth into other sharks, fish, octopuses, and squid. Humans know very little about the frilled shark because it lives deep in the ocean, off the coasts of Japan, New Zealand, and Australia.In its 80 million years on the planet, it has rarely come into contact with humans or been seen or filmed in its natural habitat. Clearly, freaked-out 19th-century sailors were the first to write about it. The frilled fish has a remarkably simple anatomy, probably because of a lack of nutrients in its aquatic environment. But there’s no definitive answer about why it outlived its Cretaceous Period contemporaries. So for now, it remains one of those increasingly frequent reminders that some of the creepiest beings in existence are floating beneath what appears to be a serene ocean surface.

From time to time, scientists will set out to see what’s swimming around in unexplored regions of the sea, then use the internet to show the world what got tangled up in their nets full of nope.
For example, earlier this year, an international team of scientists sponsored by Australian museums pulled up some creatures from more than two miles beneath the ocean. They wanted to see what kind of animals live where there is perpetual darkness, crushing pressure and inhospitable temperatures.They found things like a red crab covered in dozens of thorny spikes that would be quickly sent back to the chef at Red Lobster. And they discovered a coffinfish, a blue-eyed, red-finned trickster that uses “a fishing rod tipped with a fluffy bait on top of its head” to lure prey close enough to snag.

NUMAZU, JAPAN – JANUARY 21: In this handout picture released by Awashima Marine Park, a 1.6 meter long Frill shark swims in a tank after being found by a fisherman at a bay in Numazu, on January 21, 2007 in Numazu, Japan. The frill shark, also known as a Frilled shark usually lives in waters of a depth of 600 meters and so it is very rare that this shark is found alive at sea-level. It’s body shape and the number of gills are similar to fossils of sharks which lived 350,000,000 years ago. (Photo by Awashima Marine Park/Getty Images)

So, yes, maybe the beach is the safest place until we know more about what’s swimming around in the great beyond. On second thought, even that may be too close. As The Washington Post’s Lindsey Bever reported in September, the high winds and heavy rains of Hurricane Harvey washed “a mysterious sea creature with fangs and no face” onto the shore in Texas.

What’s your thoughts? You start dying when you stop dreaming.